Mazeppa, Georgia

When you look at old maps of Milton County you may come across a small village called Mazeppa. To picture Mazeppa you have to know about Milton County. Milton County was created on December 18, 1857 from parts of northeastern Cobb, southeastern Cherokee, and southwestern Forsyth counties. The county was named for John Milton, Secretary of State of Georgia from 1777 to 1799. In 1931, when Milton was merged with Fulton County to save it from bankruptcy during the Great Depression.

map1895

What was Mazeppa named for? How can we learn more about this community. Looking at the Georgia Gazetteer we find.

Georgia State Gazetter and business directory 1881-1882p842

So its earliest beginnings was as a post office for locals to drop off mail. In many stories Mazeppa is mentioned in plays and in theatrics. Mazeppa is a narrative poem written by the English romantic poet Lord Byron in 1819. Here is a poem by a local who elaborated a poem.
Sunny South, Mar. 21, 1891 -- page 7

I did find one mention of a young man who entered into an agricultural contest using new techniques.
Southern World, Nov. 1, 1882 -- page 9

And another sad story from the Rock Island Argus that seemed sensationalized. Seems a brother surprised another an he cracked his skull.
Rock Island daily Argus., September 24, 1887, Image 2

Yet another story involved a farmhand upset ab0ut his circumstances.
Banner-Watchman, Jul. 29, 1884 -- page 1

Mazeppa like most of North Fulton County had a lot of Indian activity as many tribes made their homes along the Upper Chattahoochee. Relics and artifacts were probably bountiful in farms where they turned over fresh earth to discover treasures beneath. Here is an example.
pipe

1. Dillman, Caroline Matheny (2003). “Milton County”. New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 10, 2011.
2. Georgia County Maps
3. Georgia State Gazetteer and Business Directory 1881-1882
4. Sunny South, Mar. 21, 1891 — page 7
5. Southern World, Nov. 1, 1882 — page 9
6. Rock Island daily Argus., September 24, 1887, Image 2
7. Banner-Watchman, Jul. 29, 1884 — page 1
8. Pipes and Smoking Customs of the American Aborigines, Based on Material in the U.S. National Museum Joseph D. McGuire, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1899 – Indians of North America – 295 pages

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